NOV
16

5 Ways to Avoid Overeating this Thanksgiving (Without Feeling Deprived)

5 Ways to Avoid Overeating this Thanksgiving (Without Feeling Deprived)

Eating may be the reason for the season, but there’s a fine line between feeling pleasantly fed and gorging yourself to the point of agony. Here’s how to stay in control this year.

Overfed photo
Show up satisfied 

Have you ever walked into the kitchen starving, opened the fridge, and ate the first thing you saw (and the second, and the third…)? That’s not how you want to approach Thanksgiving dinner.

It’s tempting to arrive at dinner famished in preparation for the big meal. However, our ability to make good decisions tends to break down once we become too hungry. Instead, eat your typical breakfast, a light lunch, and if needed, a healthy snack a few hours before dinner. Focus on fiber-rich foods like fruits and vegetables to keep calories in check and hunger pangs at bay.

Save evidence of appetizers

Our stomachs can’t count. Our memories are even worse at math (i.e. have I eaten two bacon-wrapped dates or three?) Leaving your hor d’oeuvres’ skewers, toothpicks, shrimp tails, and chicken bones in-sight provides tangible evidence of how much you’ve eaten. 

Research shows these visual reminders help us eat less. Researchers at Cornell University gave Superbowl party-goers a bucket of chicken wings. For some party-goers, researchers cleared away their bone scraps. For others, researchers provided a bowl to put bone scraps in, and left the bowl on the table. Not surprisingly, those who were forced to look at their bony remains ate 28% less.

Pause for conversation

We tend to eat less mindfully when we eat at social gatherings. Eating with others is part of the fun of Thanksgiving, but don’t let your company cause you to overeat.

When your mind is focused on your sister-in-law’s vacation photos or your cousin’s funny story, it’s not focused on your food. While most of us know not to talk with our mouth’s full, try not to listen with your mouth full, either. If you find yourself engrossed in good dinner conversation, put down the fork and give your fellow diners the attention they deserve. After they finish their point, pick the fork back up, and give your food the attention it deserves. Take a moment to notice your dinner’s colors, textures, aromas, flavors, temperatures, and mouthfeel. Savor everything about this particular eating experience—after all, it only comes around once a year!

Serve food off the table

Out of site is out of mind. You probably didn’t realize you wanted another serving of stuffing until the heaping platter caught your eye.

The tablescape plays a big role in how much we eat. The more food that’s in front of us, the more tempted we are to overeat. Especially if your favorite food is conveniently located inches from your plate. Rather, have guests serve themselves in the kitchen or at a separate serving table—and leave the food there throughout dinner. If you’re still hungry, by all means, go get seconds! By physically standing up to do so, your decision to continue eating is a more conscious one. 

Eat to 80%

Remember how many Thanksgiving dinners you felt almost sickeningly full? Then remember how when dessert was served, more room in your stomach magically appeared?

Most Americans stop eating when they’re full (and in many cases, ‘full’ means ‘in pain’). Those in leaner cultures stop eating when they’re no longer hungry. In fact, the Okinawans—Japanese islanders known for their longevity—have an expression for when to stop eating. They call the concept hara hachi bu—eating until you’re just 80 percent full. Studies show that if you serve yourself 20% less, you probably won't even notice. Study participants noticed when they were served 30% less, but a 20% a difference flew under their radar.

 

Continue reading
4702 Hits
OCT
18

Why Food-Based Vitamins like Rainbow Light are Best

Why Food-Based Vitamins like Rainbow Light are Best

Rainbow Light logo
The best way to meet your nutrient needs is to eat a variety of healthy foods. While a ”food first” approach is important, sometimes life gets in the way. Busy schedules may lead to skipped meals, picky eating habits may make for limited diets, or dietary restrictions may make it difficult to cover your nutritional bases. For cases like these, multivitamins are helpful. Think of them as a nutritional insurance policy.

Choosing a high-quality vitamin is important. “Whole-food” vitamins are popular right now. The nutrients in these products are derived from food rather than nutrient extracts. Whole-food vitamins are made by putting a bunch of nutrient-dense foods into a stainless steel tank, then introducing a live bacteria culture that feeds on the food. This process creates a food-like matrix that’s then made into tablets.

Whole-food vitamins come with pros and cons. On one hand, they tend to be well tolerated and well absorbed. On the other hand, this food-like matrix is expensive to produce, leading to pricy bottles of vitamins. The matrix is also very bulky, which limits the amount of nutrients manufacturers can fit in a single tablet. The extra bulk results in very large tablets, or tablets with fewer nutrients.

Rainbow Light was one of the first companies to make a whole-food vitamin 20 years ago. While some of these products are still available, the company sought to make a more potent, more affordable product. So they shifted their focus to “food-based” rather than “whole-food”.

Food-based formulas are somewhere in between a whole-food vitamin and a vitamin that uses nutrient extracts, like Centrum, for example. The ‘base’ is mix of spirulina, a botanical blend, and a food-like matrix similar to that of a whole-food vitamin. But they still use extracts to help get nutrient amounts up to desired levels. As a result, food-based formulas like Rainbow Light have higher potencies of nutrients, while keeping the size of the tablet reasonable. For example, you’ll be hard pressed to find a whole-food multivitamin vitamin with calcium in it (personally, I’ve looked far and wide) because calcium is a bulky nutrient and manufacturers aren’t able to fit it in a whole-food tablet. Rainbow Light’s Women’s One multivitamin, on the other hand, has 20% of the daily value of calcium—more than what’s in a serving a dairy.


Rainbow light products

Not only are Rainbow Light products more nutrient-dense and easier to swallow than whole-food products, they’re also less expensive and more stable. They use reputable manufacturing practices, too. All Rainbow Light products are tested by third-party labs to verify that what's on the label is in the bottle, and that the products are free of heavy metals, pesticides, and other contaminants.

Rainbow Light vitamins are now available at all Sunset locations.

Rainbow Light Vitamins

 

Continue reading
9199 Hits